Can Poor Oral Hygiene Cause Acne?

Your oral hygiene and health has an impact far beyond just your teeth and gums. Not only does research show a link between gum disease and heart disease, it also suggests a connection between your oral health and clear skin. If you’ve been struggling with acne that just won’t go away, there’s a chance that oral bacteria may be the culprit!

woman checking her chin and cheek for acne

The Link Between Healthy Teeth and Clear Skin

If the thought of healthy pearly whites is not enough to motivate you to practice good oral hygiene, maybe this will encourage you: studies show that oral bacteria from an infected tooth or gums can get onto your face, irritating your skin and causing you to break out. Research suggests that if your acne is clustered around your chin, lips, or cheeks, this may be a sign that poor oral hygiene is the cause.

You can limit the amount of bad bacteria in your mouth by following a good dental hygiene routine. Brush your teeth twice daily for two minutes each time, floss each day, and visit our office regularly for professional cleanings and exams. When it comes to brushing teeth and washing your face, order matters. Be sure you’re washing your face after you brush your teeth to clean away any bacteria from your mouth that may get onto your face as a result of brushing.

If you’re wondering if your oral health may be to blame for your acne, schedule a professional cleaning at our office. Dr. Desai and our team will carefully examine your mouth and note any problem areas that may be behind your skin issues. Treating your skin may be as simple as addressing your oral health.

To ask our team any questions about the link between oral hygiene and acne or to schedule your next visit to our office, contact us today!

Contact us to schedule an appointment today!

What Is Gingivitis?

You know from dental visits and toothpaste commercials that gingivitis is something you want to avoid. But what do you really know about gingivitis? What causes it and how can you prevent it? We have all the answers for you here.

An Overview of Gingivitis

Gingivitis is inflammation of the gum line near your teeth. It’s a mild form of gum disease or periodontitis. Symptoms of gingivitis include red or swollen gums that may bleed while brushing or flossing, bad breath, and receding gums. Gingivitis in common but can cause deeper problems if not treated, and can eventually lead to periodontitis and tooth loss.

dark haired girl holding her lower lip wondering about gingivitis

Causes

Gingivitis is most often caused by poor dental hygiene, but the risks increase for the elderly, people with dry mouth, and those with lowered immune response. Hormonal changes like pregnancy and certain contraceptive methods can also increase risk. Gingivitis occurs when plaque builds up around the gum line, causing the tissue to become inflamed. Plaque forms when bacteria feed off of food (especially sugar) left in the mouth. This leads to tartar (the hardening of plaque) on teeth, cavities, and bad breath.

Prevention

In order to prevent gingivitis, you must take good care of your teeth. Brush two times a day for 2 minutes each time. Floss daily, especially after meals. Reduce sugar intake. Oral bacteria feed on sugar in the mouth. Maintain dental appointments for cleaning. At your dental appointment, we’ll scrape off tartar and plaque that brushing can’t remove.

Treatment

If we see gingivitis at your next visit, we’ll let you know. Please let us know if you notice any of the signs or symptoms. We will help guide you toward a treatment plan that is right for you. This may include a deep clean of your teeth, or simply better maintenance of tooth care at home. We also recommend you consider purchasing a gingivitis-fighting mouthwash in addition to your daily brushing and flossing. Look for the active ingredients cetylpyridinium chloride and chlorhexidine.

If you suspect you may have gingivitis, contact us today. We’ll talk you through ways to improve the condition of the gums and may want to schedule an appointment. You don’t want your condition to worsen, so please let us know if you have concerns!

Contact us to schedule an appointment today!

What Is a Frenectomy?

A frenectomy sounds serious and scary, so when your dentist says you may need one, it’s common to feel a little nervous. We’ll explain what this procedure actually entails, and if you should take any precautions with your oral health before or after you’ve had one.

What Are Frenula?

A frenulum is just a small bit of tissue that helps prevent a particular organ from moving much. They are very helpful in keeping everything in their place, giving you more control over those particular parts of your body.

wide open toothy mouth displaying frenula

Frenectomy Definition

A frenectomy involves removing a frenulum. There are three types of frenectomies that are common in dentistry:
1. Lingual: Removal of the tissue that connects your tongue and mouth floor.
2. Labial: Removal of the tissue that connects your upper lip to the gums of your upper teeth.
3. Gingival: Removal of the gum tissue that connects two teeth.

Why Would I Need a Frenectomy?

Sometimes, frenula can actually cause harm, especially when they are overgrown and begin to add unnecessary discomfort and pressure on surrounding tissues. We have seen this occur with the aforementioned frenula, which can cause pain, gum recession, gaps between teeth, ability to properly speak and eat, and impact the function of teeth.

Frenectomies usually happen while the frenula are still developing or have just developed, so they are more common in children (either before or just after permanent teeth come in) in order to prevent further damage.

Frenectomy Procedure

Frenectomies are easy and painless procedures, and involve a simple laser to remove the excess tissue. In fact, the procedure usually lasts for around 20 minutes, and there isn’t much down time necessary after the procedure is over!

Your child’s dentist will be able to check their frenula growth during their exams, which is one of the reasons why it’s so important to schedule routine dental appointments and examinations twice a year. At North Richland Hills Dentistry, we’re dedicated to delivering superior service to all of our clients. Contact us to schedule an appointment today!

Will My Gums Grow Back?

Brunette young woman wearing a blue shirt in a grove of foliage looks concerned about her gum recession

As you get older, you may notice that your gums appear to be receding from your teeth. Today, we want to talk about what may be causing your gum recession and how we treat and reverse receding gums.

What Causes Receding Gums?

A variety of factors can cause gums to recede. Poor oral hygiene allows bacteria to grow, accumulate into plaque, and harden into tartar, which can inflame gums and cause them to recede from your teeth. If left untreated, gum inflammation can advance into gum disease. Brushing too vigorously (or with anything other than a soft-bristled toothbrush) can also cause gum recession. For some patients, we can create a customized nightguard that helps limit tooth grinding at night, which may be causing your gums to recede. And in other cases, you may have your genetics to blame!

Do Gums Grow Back?

We’ll start with the bad news: unfortunately, gums do not grow back. However, the good news is that there are several things that Dr. Desai and the rest of our team at North Richland Hills Dentistry can do to help repair gum recession. The most common treatment is called a gum graft. In this surgical procedure, we take tissue from one part of your mouth (often the roof of your mouth) and add it along your existing gums. In addition to stopping gum recession in its tracks and giving you a more even gum line, gum grafts also reduce tooth sensitivity and protect the roots of your teeth from decay.

What Should I Do If You Notice Gum Recession?

If you notice that your gums are receding, let us know. In the meantime, you can protect yourself from further gum recession by practicing a proper oral care routine that includes brushing your teeth twice a day for two minutes each time, flossing at least once a day, and regularly visiting our office for checkups and cleanings. To ask our team any questions or to schedule your next visit, contact our office!